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Posts Tagged ‘#ThursdayDoors’

Worker housing door, Cannery Row, Monterey, California

Worker housing door, Cannery Row, Monterey, California

On my recent trip to California, we stopped in Monterey and visited Cannery Row.  I had not been there in probably five or six years.  There were a lot of changes to the Cannery Row area. They have put in some nice walkways and stairways from one street down below to the lower streets.  There are a lot of new historical markers and information on the area when it was the hub of the sardine canning business and the tide pools which brought Steinbeck to the area to study marine biology.  The door above is on one of the buildings that has been added since I was last there.  It is the door to one of the “shacks” which served as housing for the cannery workers.  They are tiny houses (about 10′ x 14′) which were the home to entire families and in a lot of cases, they held two or three families in very close quarters.

Worker housing, Cannery Row

Worker housing, Cannery Row

And this is one of the houses.  They were all lined up one next to the other.  The ones here have been preserved and although the paint doesn’t look great, they have been painted to resemble what they looked like during the heyday of the sardine canneries.

While doing some reading on the houses, I came across a link between these houses and the ones that were built by the government to house those that were displaced by the San Francisco earthquake in 1906 which were also 10’x14′. After they were no longer needed, some were destroyed while others were sold and put together to make larger houses. Some disappeared entirely and it is quite possible, in fact due to the proximity, quite probable that the worker housing in Monterey was first used in San Francisco.

For a doorway to more posts with interesting doors, head over to Norm’s site.

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I know I posted doors from Stanford University last week so I hesitate to post more doors from the same place but these are beautiful doors and completely different from last week’s. These doors lead into Memorial Church (lovingly called Mem Chu) on the Stanford campus and are made of bronze.  There are three sets of exterior doors (and three of interior doors) at the front of the church.  The three sets are almost identical, except that the middle (main) entrance is wider than the other two sets.  It is a non-denominational church and always has been.  In fact, it was the first non-denominational church on the west coast when it was first dedicated in 1903.  I plan on doing an entire post on the church itself so I won’t go into much more detail.  You can read about it here and here.

One of the two main doors (double doors) that lead into the church.  They open outward and only one is ever open (or at least that I can remember over the past 40 years).

One of the two main doors (double doors) that lead into the church. They open outward and only one is ever open (or at least that I can remember over the past 40 years).

The set of double doors to the left of the middle/main doors.  This is what the middle ones would look like if they were closed.

The set of double doors to the left of the middle/main doors. This is what the middle ones would look like if they were closed.

And from the inside looking out.

And from the inside looking out.

And a peek at the exterior of Memorial Church.

And a peek at the exterior of Memorial Church on a crazy crowded day last week.

For more door photos, go over to Norm 2.0 for Thursday Doors, a weekly feature and blog hop.  His post today is here.

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Lane Hall, History Corner, Stanford University

Lane Hall, History Corner, Stanford University

On a recent visit to my alma mater, I took some door pictures to share.  This is the first.  It is the entrance to Lane Hall in History Corner of the Outer Quad at Stanford University (designed by Frederick Law Olmsted). I picked this one to photograph because my first declared major at Stanford was History and I had several very, very early morning World History classes here.  Those early morning classes were probably the reason that I quickly changed majors (several times).  My academic advisor’s office was in this building and I always loved going there.  Not just because he was quirky and brilliant, but because of the inside of this building.  All that polished wood.  All that history.  All those dreams for the future!

And here are a couple more photos to give you the feel of the building.  The top one is the gateway leading from the outer quad to the inner quad.  The second one is of the archways in the inner quad.  I never tire of photographing the corridors of the inner and outer quad.

Entering the inner quad, Stanford UniversityInner Quad arches, Stanford University

For more door photos, go over to Norm 2.0 for Thursday Doors, a weekly feature.

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