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Archive for the ‘reading’ Category

The-House-on-Mango-Street-picture
“Your abuelito is dead, Papa says early one morning in my room. Esta muerto, and then as if he just heard the news himself, crumples like a coat and cries, my brave Papa cries. I have never seen my Papa cry and I don’t know what to do.”

This meme is from Freda’s Voice. Grab a book and give it a go!
Rules:
*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader
(If you have to improvise, that’s ok.)
*Find any sentence, (or few, just don’t spoil it)
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post below in Linky. Add the post url, not your blog url.
*It’s that simple.

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Leaving Time

I recently read a novel by Jodi Picoult, her most recent novel in fact.  She always makes her readers think.  This one was no different.  It deals with a character on an elephant reserve.  We learn about memory, not just elephant memory but human memory as well.  And we learn about elephant grief and elephant mothering.  It’s really a fascinating bit of research in this novel.  If you are at all interested in memory and grief, you should pick it up.

As usualy, the ending was a surprise.  Didn’t see that coming.

In any case, here are some quotes from the novel:

“A bruise is how a body remembers it has been wronged.”

“When someone leaves you once, you expect it to happen again.  Eventually you stop getting close enough to people to let them become important to you because then you don’t notice when they drop out of your world.”

“No matter how much we try, no matter how much we want it…some stories just don’t have a happy ending.”

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“When we lose too many things–too much love–we shut ourselves off and end up losing the love we’ve shut out.  We’re double losers and the second loss we did to ourselves.” –from Things We Set On Fire by Deborah Reed

This past year I’ve read many books that have left a lasting impression on me.  The above quote is from one of those books.  The concept of shutting ourselves off is not new or foretign to me.  I’ve thought about it for a long, long time; for years.  It was not, however, until I read the quote above that I was able to put it into words.

If you’re on the look out for an wonderful, thought provoking, moving novel, you might want to take a look at this one.

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What I really mean is fiction or non-fiction reading. Which do you prefer? When I was in grade school and first learned the terms fiction and non-fiction, the way I remembered which was which was by substituting “fake” for “fiction” because I didn’t readily remember what fiction meant but I knew what fake meant! I think I was in third grade!

I’m definitely a fiction kind of person but I find that when I read fiction, I am looking for the non-fiction in it, that is to say that I look things up that interest me in the fiction to learn more about those things as well as to make sure the author didn’t screw up on their facts! Recently, I’ve read about four of Daniel Silva’s series with Gabriel Allon. These books are filled with facts and fiction based on fact and they send me straight to search for the facts or to learn more about the subjects. I’ve read about the Holocaust (there’s always so much more to learn about it than what we know or think we know), about conflict in the Middle East, about the works of Caravaggio, just to name a few topics. It’s not just his books that do that to me. It’s almost every book. If an author mentions a type of plane used in WWII, I go look it up. If the name of a museum is mentioned, I’m off to find out more about it. As far as checking “facts” presented in fiction, I’m talking about dates and chronology. For example, if an author writes a scene in which a character stays at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles and presents the date as 1992, I know they are wrong. I know that the hotel closed to guests in the 1980’s and I will go online and look for the dates to make sure I’m right. I am. Closure date was 1989. I then chalk it up to sloppy research and the rest of the book is tainted by it.

I read a lot about WWII and those books inevitably send me to find facts. Novels which make reference to art or music will do the same. Novels that reference specific locations with which I am unfamiliar will send me off to discover more.

I do enjoy reading some non-fiction but it has to be about a subject I am already interested in, or the memoirs or biography of someone I have previously hearing about in the past. One example is the Kennedy family. I am interested in all things Kennedy and have read extensively about them and books by them. In fact, my very first e-book when I got my Kindle in 2009, was True Compass by Ted Kennedy.

I just finished book #68 of an 80 book goal for 2014. I must say that the books next up on my list are all fiction but there are a few memoirs that have made the list so I might just load one of those on my Kindle. In fact, I had better run off and do that now so it will be ready to start up first thing in the morning!

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